Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Ethical Issues & Management

ETHICAL ISSUES AND MANAGEMENT PAPER Ethical Issues and Management Paper Jamie Culley University of Phoenix Online Campus Ethical Issues and Management Paper Introduction. The responsibilities of a manager go far beyond supervision. In fact, managers are forced to make important decisions every day that affect the company, their employees, and possibly the public depending on the circumstance. Managers take part in hiring, performance, evaluation, discipline, and termination. They are also involved in any circumstance that pertains to harassment and diversity, and they must make a conscious effort to set a good example for their employees. The following paper will focus primarily on discipline; describe the moral and ethical issues faced by managers dealing with discipline; include how the issue affects other individuals; explain how relationships between social issues and ethically responsible management practices apply to discipline; provide a workplace example of an ethical dilemma involving discipline; and discuss any laws governing the manager who provided the discipline in such an ethical dilemma. Discipline Describe the moral and ethical issues faced by managers dealing with your selected topic. Include how the issue affects other individuals. In the case of discipline, managers must know how to appropriately discipline their employees. Managers must ensure equality amongst employees in regard to discipline so as to obey the U. S. Sentencing Guidelines, which â€Å"specify that all employees in an organization must receive consistent discipline for similar infractions† (Trevino & Nelson, 2007, p. 159). Managers must also ensure equality amongst employees in regard to discipline because it is the ethical thing to do. For instance, consider that a certain man has been working for a company for 20 years and he gets aught misusing corporate resources. In this scenario, a manager might be tempted to give him a warning or even write him up for his actions because of his loyalty to the company. Now consider that a certain man has been working for the same company for two years and he also gets caught misusing corporate resources. Yet, in this scenario the manager terminates him for his actions. The U. S. Sentencing Guideli nes seek to ensure that both employees are given the same measure of discipline, which is also the ethical thing to do on the manager's behalf. Furthermore, â€Å"hiring, performance evaluation, discipline, and terminations can be ethical issues because they all involve honesty, fairness, and the dignity of the individual† (Trevino & Nelson, 2007, p. 162, 163). If values such as honesty, dignity, and fairness are acknowledged in circumstances involving discipline, then managers and their companies should have no real concern for negative, public exposure. There are effective ways that managers can go about disciplining employees for their actions. These ways should involve disciplining employees in a constructive and professional manner. Discipline should generally be done in private, allow input from the employee, and it should be consistent with the way past employees have been treated for similar actions or behaviors (Trevino & Nelson, 2007). Discipline affects other individuals such as the affected employee's family members, co-workers, and the general public. When an employee is disciplined in the appropriate manner, a message is sent to the rest of the company's employees. This message communicates that certain measures will be taken to address and rid the company of inappropriate behaviors and actions. As a result, employees will know to be more conscious of their behaviors and actions to ensure that they are not disciplined for the same reasons. If discipline has been taken to the extreme and an employee has been terminated from a company, the family of that employee will be greatly affected. What if that employee is not eligible for unemployment? This could trigger a huge financial burden for the entire family. Finally, the public is very much affected when an employee endures termination as their disciplinary measure. As a result of a termination an employment opportunity opens up for the public to apply for. This could mean that the man or woman who has been searching for a job to provide for their family will be employed and now able to fulfill the needs of his or her family. The economy is affected in various ways as people are terminated from their employed positions (Trevino & Nelson, 2007). Explain how the relationship between social issues and ethically responsible management practices apply to your topic. Social issues and how they relate to ethically responsible management practices need to be considered when disciplinary action is involved between management and employees. Managers need to research why an employee is exuding behaviors such as tardiness, harassment, misuse of corporate resources, and discrimination. For example, a newly hired employee named Judy has been consistently late for her first month of employment. Her manager should address her behavior privately, and ask her why she is often late for work. The case could be that Judy is a single mom of three children who attend a private school on the other side of the city where no bus route has been established. In this case, her manager should find out if flexible work hours can become more available to all employees on the team and go from there. Another social issue could be that Joe, a long-time employee, is going through a divorce, which is costing him a fortune. As a result, Joe cannot afford his car payments and is now without reliable transportation to and from work. Joe's financial status is communicating poverty. Over time, Joe is not only tardy to work because of his transportation issues, but his clothes are looking ragged and he is in no position to meet with clients. Joe's work performance is now failing because of his financial situation. In this case, disciplinary action needs to be carefully considered and documented when dealing with Joe's poor work performance. It is important to document the disciplinary action taken so that the same discipline can be directed at a future situation to ensure equality (Trevino & Nelson, 2007). Provide a workplace example of an ethical dilemma involving your topic. Did any laws govern the manager's actions? A workplace dilemma involving discipline could involve an employee who is being harassed because of her sexual preference, and as a result she is harassing people in retaliation by directing hateful comments toward fellow co-workers. In this scenario, several people’s behaviors need to be addressed: the employees initially harassing the woman because of her sexual preference, and the woman being harassed who is retaliating. Laws do govern the manager’s actions, especially if the manager ignores the issue at hand. Managers are now being held responsible for their employees’ actions if inappropriate behaviors are not dealt with and knowingly ignored. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which is linked with the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission is in place to ensure discrimination is eliminated from the work place and dealt with appropriately (Trevino & Nelson, 2007). Conclusion. In summary, employees are held accountable to their managers and managers to their employees. Managers are held accountable to their employees because it is their responsibility to make ethical decisions and abide by laws that govern their decision-making. Managers must strive to practice honesty, dignity, and fairness in their workplace as pertains to disciplining employees. They should also discipline employees the ethical way by holding a private meeting, being constructive, professional, allowing the employee’s input, and in consistency with past disciplinary action. Social issues that pertain to the work place involve family issues, personal issues, diversity, and much more (Trevino & Nelson, 2007). References: Trevino, L. , & Nelson, K. (2007). Managing business ethics: Straight talk about how to do it right (4th ed. ). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Ethical Issues & Management ETHICAL ISSUES AND MANAGEMENT PAPER Ethical Issues and Management Paper Jamie Culley University of Phoenix Online Campus Ethical Issues and Management Paper Introduction. The responsibilities of a manager go far beyond supervision. In fact, managers are forced to make important decisions every day that affect the company, their employees, and possibly the public depending on the circumstance. Managers take part in hiring, performance, evaluation, discipline, and termination. They are also involved in any circumstance that pertains to harassment and diversity, and they must make a conscious effort to set a good example for their employees. The following paper will focus primarily on discipline; describe the moral and ethical issues faced by managers dealing with discipline; include how the issue affects other individuals; explain how relationships between social issues and ethically responsible management practices apply to discipline; provide a workplace example of an ethical dilemma involving discipline; and discuss any laws governing the manager who provided the discipline in such an ethical dilemma. Discipline Describe the moral and ethical issues faced by managers dealing with your selected topic. Include how the issue affects other individuals. In the case of discipline, managers must know how to appropriately discipline their employees. Managers must ensure equality amongst employees in regard to discipline so as to obey the U. S. Sentencing Guidelines, which â€Å"specify that all employees in an organization must receive consistent discipline for similar infractions† (Trevino & Nelson, 2007, p. 159). Managers must also ensure equality amongst employees in regard to discipline because it is the ethical thing to do. For instance, consider that a certain man has been working for a company for 20 years and he gets aught misusing corporate resources. In this scenario, a manager might be tempted to give him a warning or even write him up for his actions because of his loyalty to the company. Now consider that a certain man has been working for the same company for two years and he also gets caught misusing corporate resources. Yet, in this scenario the manager terminates him for his actions. The U. S. Sentencing Guideli nes seek to ensure that both employees are given the same measure of discipline, which is also the ethical thing to do on the manager's behalf. Furthermore, â€Å"hiring, performance evaluation, discipline, and terminations can be ethical issues because they all involve honesty, fairness, and the dignity of the individual† (Trevino & Nelson, 2007, p. 162, 163). If values such as honesty, dignity, and fairness are acknowledged in circumstances involving discipline, then managers and their companies should have no real concern for negative, public exposure. There are effective ways that managers can go about disciplining employees for their actions. These ways should involve disciplining employees in a constructive and professional manner. Discipline should generally be done in private, allow input from the employee, and it should be consistent with the way past employees have been treated for similar actions or behaviors (Trevino & Nelson, 2007). Discipline affects other individuals such as the affected employee's family members, co-workers, and the general public. When an employee is disciplined in the appropriate manner, a message is sent to the rest of the company's employees. This message communicates that certain measures will be taken to address and rid the company of inappropriate behaviors and actions. As a result, employees will know to be more conscious of their behaviors and actions to ensure that they are not disciplined for the same reasons. If discipline has been taken to the extreme and an employee has been terminated from a company, the family of that employee will be greatly affected. What if that employee is not eligible for unemployment? This could trigger a huge financial burden for the entire family. Finally, the public is very much affected when an employee endures termination as their disciplinary measure. As a result of a termination an employment opportunity opens up for the public to apply for. This could mean that the man or woman who has been searching for a job to provide for their family will be employed and now able to fulfill the needs of his or her family. The economy is affected in various ways as people are terminated from their employed positions (Trevino & Nelson, 2007). Explain how the relationship between social issues and ethically responsible management practices apply to your topic. Social issues and how they relate to ethically responsible management practices need to be considered when disciplinary action is involved between management and employees. Managers need to research why an employee is exuding behaviors such as tardiness, harassment, misuse of corporate resources, and discrimination. For example, a newly hired employee named Judy has been consistently late for her first month of employment. Her manager should address her behavior privately, and ask her why she is often late for work. The case could be that Judy is a single mom of three children who attend a private school on the other side of the city where no bus route has been established. In this case, her manager should find out if flexible work hours can become more available to all employees on the team and go from there. Another social issue could be that Joe, a long-time employee, is going through a divorce, which is costing him a fortune. As a result, Joe cannot afford his car payments and is now without reliable transportation to and from work. Joe's financial status is communicating poverty. Over time, Joe is not only tardy to work because of his transportation issues, but his clothes are looking ragged and he is in no position to meet with clients. Joe's work performance is now failing because of his financial situation. In this case, disciplinary action needs to be carefully considered and documented when dealing with Joe's poor work performance. It is important to document the disciplinary action taken so that the same discipline can be directed at a future situation to ensure equality (Trevino & Nelson, 2007). Provide a workplace example of an ethical dilemma involving your topic. Did any laws govern the manager's actions? A workplace dilemma involving discipline could involve an employee who is being harassed because of her sexual preference, and as a result she is harassing people in retaliation by directing hateful comments toward fellow co-workers. In this scenario, several people’s behaviors need to be addressed: the employees initially harassing the woman because of her sexual preference, and the woman being harassed who is retaliating. Laws do govern the manager’s actions, especially if the manager ignores the issue at hand. Managers are now being held responsible for their employees’ actions if inappropriate behaviors are not dealt with and knowingly ignored. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which is linked with the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission is in place to ensure discrimination is eliminated from the work place and dealt with appropriately (Trevino & Nelson, 2007). Conclusion. In summary, employees are held accountable to their managers and managers to their employees. Managers are held accountable to their employees because it is their responsibility to make ethical decisions and abide by laws that govern their decision-making. Managers must strive to practice honesty, dignity, and fairness in their workplace as pertains to disciplining employees. They should also discipline employees the ethical way by holding a private meeting, being constructive, professional, allowing the employee’s input, and in consistency with past disciplinary action. Social issues that pertain to the work place involve family issues, personal issues, diversity, and much more (Trevino & Nelson, 2007). References: Trevino, L. , & Nelson, K. (2007). Managing business ethics: Straight talk about how to do it right (4th ed. ). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

John Hawthorne s The House Of Seven Gables - 831 Words

Born July 4, 1804, in Salem, Mass. Reclusive at times, wrote twice-told tales, the house of seven gables, the scarlet letter and more. Married Sophia Peabody and fathered Una. Died in 1864. Buried in Concord, Massachusetts. Great-great-great-great grandfather, John Hawthorne, was judge at Salem witch trials The novel is set in the mid-1600s in Boston, Massachusetts. It encompasses a period of seven years and the plot involves lover-husband-wife, the theme of this book is developed in the context of evil vs good. ï  ® Puritan beliefs: – An emphasis on private study of the Bible – A desire to see education and enlightenment for the masses so they could read the Bible for them– Simplicity in worship, the exclusion of vestments, images, candles, etc. – Did not celebrate traditional holidays which they believed to be in violation of the regulative principle of worship. – Believed the Sabbath was still obligatory for Christians, although they believed the Sabbath had been changed to Sunday – Some approved of the church’s involvement with the courts. which did not include some of the traditional practices of the Church of England? Although the Church did not officially control the State in Puritan settlements, religion and government were closely intertwined. The ministers counseled the magistrates in all affairs concerning the settlement and its citizens. The Puritans had strict rules against the theater, religious music, sen suous poetry, and frivolous dress.Show MoreRelatedGuilt as Reparation for Sin in Nathaniel Hawthornes The Scarlet Letter5500 Words   |  22 Pagesto oneamp;#8217;s wrongs. Reverend Mister Dimmesdale learns that secrecy only makes the guilt increase. Nathaniel Hawthorne is trying to display how guilt is the everlasting payment for sinful actions. The theme of guilt as reparation for sin in The Scarlet Letter is revealed through Nathaniel Hawthorneamp;#8217;s use of northeastern, colonial settings, various conflicts, and characters that must live with guilt for the sins they have committed. Nathaniel Hawthorneamp;#8217;s elaborately descriptiveRead MoreGothic Literature : Gothic Writing1974 Words   |  8 PagesCanterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. (Snodgrass) As the colonists began settling in the Americas writers began writing of racial warfare and the new settlers plan to drive the Native Americans from the frontier in notable writings like Wacousta by John Richardson and Nick of the Woods by Robert Montgomery Bird.(Snodgrass) According to Faye Ringel, â€Å"for over 200 years, all manner of Americans – intellectuals and autodidacts, captains of industry and Lumpenproletariat – have sought by various meansRead MoreBrief Survey of American Literature3339 Words   |  14 PagesAmerican / American Indian oral literature / oral tradition creation storiesï ¼Ë†Ã¨ µ ·Ã¦ º Ã§ ¥Å¾Ã¨ ¯ Ã¯ ¼â€° trickster talesï ¼Ë†Ã¦  ¶Ã¤ ½Å"å‰ §Ã¨â‚¬â€¦Ã¤ ¼  Ã¥ ¥â€¡Ã¯ ¼â€° rituals / ceremoniesï ¼Ë†Ã¥â€¦ ¸Ã¤ » ªÃ¯ ¼â€° songs / chantsï ¼Ë†Ã¦â€º ²Ã¨ ¯ Ã¯ ¼â€° Anglo Settlers’ Writings Highly religious and pragmatic - John Smith, founder of Jamestown, Virginia; Pocahontas - John Winthrop, â€Å"A Model of Christian Charity†: â€Å"†¦ We shall be as a city upon a hill. The eyes of all people are upon us†¦Ã¢â‚¬  - William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation (1630-50, pub. 1856) - Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672)Read MoreDeveloping Management Skills404131 Words   |  1617 Pagesbuilt-in pretests and posttests, focus on what you need to learn and to review in order to succeed. Visit www.mymanagementlab.com to learn more. DEVELOPING MANAGEMENT SKILLS EIGHTH EDITION David A. Whetten BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY Kim S. Cameron UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Prentice Hall Boston Columbus Indianapolis New York San Francisco Upper Saddle River Amsterdam Cape Town Dubai London Madrid Milan Munich Paris Montreal Toronto Delhi Mexico City Sao Paulo Sydney Hong Kong Seoul Singapore

Monday, December 30, 2019

Essay on The Evil Iago of Othello - 603 Words

Evil masterminds are always successful in their diabolical schemes, but each one does it in their own special way. Some may be highly ranked and powerful, but some may be simple people in a simple community. In the play Othello, the simple ancient, Iago is very successful at his schemes. Iago is able to get the trust of everyone around him, and to appear honest. He is also driven to continue with his schemes and to never quite. From the first scene of the play to the last, Iago is able to be trusted by everyone. This is one of the many reasons why Iago is so successful in his schemes, he is always trusted. In the first scene of the play we learn that Iago is helping Roderigo, win the love of Desdemona. Roderigo is trusting Iago with his†¦show more content†¦You have told me she hath received them, and returned me expectations and comfort of sudden respect and acquaintance; but I find none† (IV, ii, 186-190). Roderigo started to see that Iago is cheating on him, but Iago is smart enough, and Roderigo is dumb enough for Iago to confuse him. In the second act during the party after the defeat over the Turks, Cassio becomes very drunk and easily taken advantage of. He then runs into the room where everyone is and attacks Roderigo. Montano intervenes and is then wounded by Cassio; Othello is forced to demote Cassio from his position of Lieutenant. With Cassio devastated he asks for advice from Iag o, he then informs Cassio the only way to gain his position back is to talk to Desdemona. Cassio then leaves â€Å"good night, Honest Iago† (II, iii, 306). Shakespeare put in those two extra words on purpose; he is trying to show how Iago is already able to play with people’s minds and how manipulative he can be. Us, the audience knowing what Iago really wants to do, but Cassio puts trust into Iago with his position and future. The last person to believe Iago is honest and to trust him is Othello. Iago started to tell Othello of how Desdemona might be sleeping with Cassio, and how she is cheating on him. Othello does not believe him as there is no proof, â€Å"I’ll see before I doubt; when I doubt, prove; and on the proof there is no more but this† (III, iii, 190-191). Othello knowsShow MoreRelated Iago as the Representation of Evil in Shakespeares Othello1769 Words   |  8 PagesIago as the Representation of Evil in Othello In Shakespeares, Othello, the reader is presented the classic battle between the deceitful forces of evil and the innocence of good. It is these forces of evil that ultimately lead to the breakdown of Othello, a noble Venetian moor, well known by the people of Venice as an honorable soldier and a worthy leader. Othellos breakdown results in the murder of his wife Desdemona. Desdemona is representative of the good in nature. Good can be definedRead More The Absolute Evil of Iago in Shakespeares Othello Essay2029 Words   |  9 PagesThe Absolute Evil of Iago in Othello    What marks consummate villainy is the willingness to be absolutely evil-to have no qualms about being diabolical and no strains of human morality.   Because feeling for another leads one to experience guilt, even an iota of empathy is a character flaw that will lead to the downfall of a villain.   To succeed, the villain needs to emulate the character Iago in Othello, who consistently works his evil throughout the whole play and does not slip until the endRead MoreThe Evil Character of Iago in Shakespeares Othello Essay630 Words   |  3 PagesIago is a complex character that takes evil to a whole new level in the 1600’s and plays a key role in this tale. Iago’s main goal is to get Othello and Cassio out of the army, but in the end fails to ruin Cassio’s life, only Othello’s. He uses many characters to his advantage, realizing how trustworthy and oblivious these people are. Iago cannot be relied on and has many masks, behind which he hides. He has man y disguises and secrets that he hides from everyone and his acting skills come in handyRead MoreIago as Evil in William Shakespeares Othello Essay1138 Words   |  5 PagesIago as Evil in William Shakespeares Othello Othello is famously regarded as one of Shakespeares greatest tragedies. It explores the downfall of a great general Othello through a series of unlucky circumstances. Othellos character shows a man of high status whose job, marriage and life is ruined because of his insecurities by a man named Iago. Iago (Othellos ensign) is able to manipulate Othello, Othellos wife Desdemona and his own friend Roderigo (a VenetianRead MoreThe Many Evils of Iago in Othello by Shakespeare Essay examples1265 Words   |  6 PagesThe Many Evils of Iago in Othello by Shakespeare Iago is a man of jealousy, and he is proposing revenge against Cassio and Othello. He claims both Cassio and Othello have seduced his wife, Emilia, a warm-hearted, simple woman. He proposes, as revenge of wife for wife, to put Othello into such a jealousy as judgement can cure (Jorgensen 59). We know therefore from the start why Iago hates Othello . . . (Modern 3). Iagos hatred for the Moor is deep, and there is apparently reason. TheRead MoreIago as an Evil Manipulator in William Shakespeares Othello Essay719 Words   |  3 PagesIago as an Evil Manipulator in William Shakespeares Othello The statement Iago is an evil manipulator in my opinion is true. I see Iago as psychologically astute, deceiving and a misanthrope. His sadistic character hurts everyone in a web of deceit. Iago is Shakespeares most plausible and intriguing villains. The main themes in this play are appearance and reality, love, hate and jealousy. I intend to focus on Iago and see how his character changes and how Read MoreOthello: Good vs Evil1525 Words   |  7 PagesGood Or Evil: A Critical Analysis of Othello’s Main Characters William Shakespeare’s Othello is a classic depiction of a struggle between good and evil. In the play,, the characters are faced with the choice to either conquer or succumb to the overpowering force of evil. Shakespeare places his characters on a sort of spectrum in which a character’s amount of god or evil can be represented by a shade of color: black representing pure evil, white representing absolute goodness, and a shade of greyRead MoreMalignant Iago of Shakespeares Othello Essay1721 Words   |  7 Pages      Pure evil is like a cancerous plague that harms all those who come upon it.   In the tragic play â€Å"Othello† by William Shakespeare, Iago is a character that represents pure evil – a malignant cancer to all those around him.   His evil is exposed through his choice of words, his ability to manipulate people, and his opportunistic ways.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   First, Iago’s evil is shown through his choice of words that demonstrate his vulgarity and his sinister intentions.   Iago’s language is extremely baseRead MoreOthello Character Analysis1678 Words   |  7 Pagesmasterpieces and tragedies such as Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, King Lear and Romeo and Juliet caused a remarkable turning point in English literature as whole, and English drama in particular.His play Othellois one of his unforgettable tragedies. The play of Othello is the finest example of Shakespeare’s poetic and narrative style. Thus, Shakespeare is known as the most influential dramatist whose tragedies found the way to interact with the audience.Shakespeare’s Othello is about jealousy, revenge and deceptionRead MoreThe Mirror Of Weaknesses Of Shakespeare s Othello Essay1483 Words   |  6 PagesWeaknesses Humans are contradictions, which good and evil nature both exists. The grand tragic play Othello written by Shakespeare illustrates the contradictions in human natures through the display of tragic falls of various characters such as Othello, Iago, and Roderigo. Othello, the protagonist of the play, fell in love with the daughter of a nobleman, Desdemona. However, this relationship is soon broken up because Othello believed the accusation from Iago, Othello’s subordinate, towards Desdemona for

Saturday, December 21, 2019

Omens in Julius Caesar - 578 Words

Though it can be argued whether or not omens can prevent the inevitable, in Julius Caesar, the power, though often ignored, and the roles that the omens play are so important in the outcome of the characters themselves and, therefore, the outcome of the play. Omens in Julius Caesar, and especially the refusal to listen to them, are so much of what makes the play a tragedy. From advice for Caesar to beware the Ides of March, to abnormal weather, and the odd and somewhat frightening dreams, Julius Caser is full of vastly different omens. The warnings against the Ides of March, first heard from the soothsayer, are specifically the most repeated omen throughout the play. It is repeated so much because it is predicts the impending doom upon Caesar. Caesar’s refusal to listen to the soothsayer, and the various other warnings against the Ides of March, shows that there is no difference between fate and free will. Caesar, who is completely cocky and confident in himself, such that he can put off fate, has the free will to ignore the warnings, to ignore the signs, and he does just so. Because of Caesar’s ignorance, his fate is sealed from then on. If Caesar had somehow read the warnings correctly, or even at all, his fate would be completely different; but his fate is not the only one which would be different. Whether or not Caesar would be king is arguable, but what is not, is the fact that if the warnings about the Ides of March would have been taken with more seriousness,Show MoreRelatedJulius Caesar Omens Essay1466 Words   |  6 PagesBy: Phillip Gigliotti Omens Are Not To Be Ignored A sign of the future of good or evil is considered to be an omen. Plenty of omens are displayed throughout the Tragedy of Julius Caesar, written by Shakespeare. If these omens are ignored negativity is often the only outcome for the character as demonstrated in the play. Some of these omens include Caesar ignoring Calpurnia’s unpleasant dream and his servant’s simple warning. Cassius disagrees with Casca’s statement of the god’s anger toward Caesar’sRead MoreTheme Of Omens In Julius Caesar1008 Words   |  5 Pagesor omens in their own manner, yet their own interpretations may vastly differ from how they are intended to be interpreted.Omens are used to foreshadow future events and for warning individuals, but many choose to omit omens with messages that they do not want to hear. William Shakespeare establishes an omen motif in his tragedy, Julius Caesar. Throughout the play, there are plenty of mystifying omens present.Characters in Julius Caesar either ignore, misinterpret, or acknowledge these omens, andRead MoreThe Omen: Forces of Nature Play a Very Important Role in Julius Caesar1127 Words   |  5 PagesThe Omen Forces of nature play a very important role in Julius Caesar. There is much attention paid to omens and nightmares and how they foreshadow Caesars death. The events that lead to the death of Julius Caesar are predicted by omens from multiple characters such as Calpurnia, Caesars wife, the Soothsayer, and a teacher, Artemidorus. The omens in the play were ignored by a majority of the main characters. Even though ignored, these omens appear even after Caesars death to show the guilt-riddenRead MoreHow Portents, Omens and Dreams Add to the Dramatic Tension Before Julius Caesars murder in Julius Caesar989 Words   |  4 PagesHow Portents, Omens and Dreams Add to the Dramatic Tension Before Julius Caesars murder in Julius Caesar Julius Caesar is one of Shakespeares greatest plays because in it he deals powerfully and excitingly with the themes of power and conscience. Particularly in Julius Caesar Shakespeare uses disruptions as portents, omens and predictions to give us a sense of approach of terrible events. Shakespeare lived the Elizabethan period; therefore like many Elizabethans he wouldRead MoreDiscuss what the various responses to omens, nightmares and other supernatural events show about the struggle between fate and freewill in Julius Caesar?1856 Words   |  8 PagesOne of the major concerns presented by Shakespeare in Julius Caesar is the struggle between fate and free will. This struggle is evident throughout the play through Shakespeares continual presentation of the supernatural. The supernatural is present in many different forms in the text, for example through omens, nightmares and sacrifices. Shakespeare believed that life was a combination of fate and freewill, he presents this idea to the audience through different events that occur throughout theRead MoreA Predetermined Fate The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare 801 Words   |  3 PagesThe Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare depicts the dictatorship of a powerful Roman emperor in 44 B.C. This play consists of various elements so me of which are historical events, people and places, which disclose the conspiracy to overthrow Julius Caesar. The fates of the characters are predetermined although they attempt to avoid and ultimately change their own fate, which attributes to the humanity each character possesses giving a predetermined fate that is unavoidable and uncontrollableRead MoreThe Death Of Julius Caesar By William Shakespeare And The Rwandan Genocide1637 Words   |  7 Pages Warnings play a very important role in the play Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare and the Rwandan Genocide in 1994. The omens and nightmares in the play foreshadow the death of Julius Caesar that later resulted to chaos in Rome. The events that lead to the assassination of Julius Caesar are predicted by omens from characters such as his wife Calphurnia, the Soothsayer, Artemidorus and from the environment. Similarly, many warnings in the Rwanda history triggered the genocidal slaughterRead MoreSelf Righteousness In Jul ius Caesar1066 Words   |  5 PagesIt appears that the largest conflict surrounding William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar seems to be the uncertainty concerning the exact role that Caesar himself is meant to fulfill within the play. It is truly unknown whether he was meant to be the domineering tyrant that need desperately to be stopped in the interest of the greater good or the vulnerable victim of Brutus’ lineage-driven self righteousness. The unknown significance of Caesar’s hearing impediment and his disregard for both the prophecyRead MoreCritical Criticism Of Julius Caesar942 Words   |  4 PagesShakespeare in 1599, Julius Caesar has become one of most eye-opening pieces on power and the use and misuse of it. In this play, Julius Caesar is depicted as egotistical and easily swayed by other’s arguments that appeal to his pride or love of self-image, as seen in Act II, Scene II, when Calpurnia, Caesar’s wife, attempted to persuade Caesar to s tay home after having dreams and seeing omens insinuating his impending death. Calphurnia’s argument temporarily convinced Caesar to grudgingly agree withRead MoreThe Derogatory Effects Of Pride On Human Life1047 Words   |  5 PagesWilliam Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar. Caesar himself is consumed by pride, and the way that others treat him only reinforces his idea that his is the strongest man in the world, and certainly the only man fit to lead Rome. Caesar’s ambition, which was caused by his pride, convinces Brutus that, despite his love for Caesar, Caesar would only hurt Rome, and therefore must die. More than that, however, Caesar’s pride directly causes his downfall. Throughout Julius Caesar, Shakespeare shows the audience

Friday, December 13, 2019

Education a Continous Process Free Essays

Baxter and Tight (1994) noted in their research that in many countries, people are being encouraged to be â€Å"lifelong learners,† people who return to school again and again throughout their lives, rather than looking at education as something that ends with graduation from high school or college (Baxter Tight, 1994). The â€Å"Lifelong Learning† movement believes that education should be an important part of people’s lives throughout their lives instead of restricting it to childhood and adolescence. The authors interviewed people who had returned to education later in life to see what factors supported or interfered with that choice. We will write a custom essay sample on Education a Continous Process or any similar topic only for you Order Now One of the observations they made was that for many older students, especially women, returning to school represented a real juggling act with their time management. This trend was so strong that a significant number of people asked to participate felt that they could not spare the hour the interview would take. This trend of women being stressed for time to do everything they and others expected of them was so strong that they mentioned that perhaps the idea of people attending school throughout their lives might be a male view because often men do not have to juggle as many important tasks as women. The women who were interviewed noted that they had family, personal and work commitments, all of which had to come before school, with the result that when they attended classes, often there was no room in their lives for any social activities connected to their academic work (Baxter Tight, 1994). However, Palwak (1999) points out that in an age of rapidly changing technology, it may be necessary to include education in one’s career plans to the worker does not become stuck with archaic skills. The difficulty in juggling time is also demonstrated in discussions on this topic by the fact that so many articles focus on retirees who return to learning because they finally have the time to study things that have interested them for many years. How to cite Education a Continous Process, Essay examples Education a Continous Process Free Essays Baxter and Tight (1994) noted in their research that in many countries, people are being encouraged to be â€Å"lifelong learners,† people who return to school again and again throughout their lives, rather than looking at education as something that ends with graduation from high school or college (Baxter Tight, 1994). The â€Å"Lifelong Learning† movement believes that education should be an important part of people’s lives throughout their lives instead of restricting it to childhood and adolescence. The authors interviewed people who had returned to education later in life to see what factors supported or interfered with that choice. We will write a custom essay sample on Education a Continous Process or any similar topic only for you Order Now One of the observations they made was that for many older students, especially women, returning to school represented a real juggling act with their time management. This trend was so strong that a significant number of people asked to participate felt that they could not spare the hour the interview would take. This trend of women being stressed for time to do everything they and others expected of them was so strong that they mentioned that perhaps the idea of people attending school throughout their lives might be a male view because often men do not have to juggle as many important tasks as women. The women who were interviewed noted that they had family, personal and work commitments, all of which had to come before school, with the result that when they attended classes, often there was no room in their lives for any social activities connected to their academic work (Baxter Tight, 1994). However, Palwak (1999) points out that in an age of rapidly changing technology, it may be necessary to include education in one’s career plans to the worker does not become stuck with archaic skills. The difficulty in juggling time is also demonstrated in discussions on this topic by the fact that so many articles focus on retirees who return to learning because they finally have the time to study things that have interested them for many years. How to cite Education a Continous Process, Essays

Thursday, December 5, 2019

Operations - Strategy - Information Technology

Question: Can develop and evaluate a conceptual solution for an innovation problem. Understand how to manage and execute the innovation process. Are able to describe, explain and apply innovation concepts, models and tools. Answer: Introduction Here in this assignment we are looking forward to understand how the Information Technology Systems could be incorporated in order to develop a competitive advantage for a business enterprise. The rising global competition among business houses has encouraged business enterprises to undertake strategies that would enable them to stay ahead of their business competitors and develop a competitive advantage in the market. In order to be successful in their business endeavours business establishments needs to undertake various kinds of calculated risks which would help them to yield profit in the long run. Ensuring an effective planning is an imperative aspect of any successful business endeavours as it helps to effectively analyse all the different factors which an organisation has to encounter in the market during the course of their day-to-day business operations. This will help the business establishments to manage the operations within the business on a daily basis in an efficient m anner and thus ensures the long term growth and success of thee organisation in the market. This is the main reason that this assignment has been taken up by us in order to understand and evaluate how innovative technologies could be utilised by the SMEs in the market in order to realise their business goals and objectives in the market (Asemi Jazi, 2010). Problem Identification and Analysis Nowadays, the business establishments are leaving no stones unturned in order to gain a competitive advantage over their rivals. They are trying to incorporate effective business strategies without realising the long term impacts and consequences of their business decisions on the business performance of the organisation in the market. The business establishments are thus becoming a victim of inefficient decision making which is invariably increasing the operational expenses for the business establishments. This is playing a vital role in increasing the operational budgets for the business establishments and as a result lowering the profit margins for the business establishments. Ineffective business decisions often prove to be detrimental for the growth and success of business establishments as it eventually cripples the business opportunities for an organisation in the market and eventually forces an organisation to shut down their business operations (Hoeven, 2009). On the other h and, ensuring an effective decision on the part of the management will essentially ensure the steady growth and success of the organisation in the market and help the business establishments to deal with the competition in the industry with rivals present in the existing framework. This will thus help in releasing business goals and help the company to come up with strategies in order to realize those goals. An effective planning could be essentially ensured if technology is utilised for the purpose of decisions making. Technology helps in reducing and minimizing the human errors in decision making and it helps the management to accurate measure and evaluates the long term implications of their business decisions. Thus, the business establishments are able to undertake better and effective decisions by evaluating the various market factors which the business establishments have to encounter during the course of their daily business operations in the market. There are various technol ogies that are available in the market which helps the business establishments to undertake effective business decisions. One of the most reputed among them is the ERP Softwares which is developed by SAP (Chen et al. 2008). Idea Generation and Screening The Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) tools developed by SAP has become one of the most popular and effective business tool which helps organizations to effectively manage their business and streamline their day to day functionalities in an effective manner. This on the other hand helps the business establishments to undertake effective decisions for the future growth and success of a business enterprise. The ERP tools help the business establishments to monitor all the diverse aspects of their business in an effective manner and thus help them to undertake an effective risk analysis in the market. This helps the small and medium business enterprises to tackle and address their business risks in a proper and effective manner and thus the business establishments are able to ensure their growth and success in the market. ERP is a very advanced and innovative business tool which can help the small and medium business enterprises to compete more effectively with their familiar and well known business compatriots in the market. It helps in creating a level playing field for the lesser known business establishments and provides them an effective platform to ensure their growth and success in the market (Davenport, 2013). In a report released by the Aberdeen Group, which the foremost provider of fact-based research, the importance of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) in ensuring the growth and success of Small to Mid-size Enterprises (SMEs) has been evaluated. The report ERP in SME: Fueling Growth and Profits, essentially describes that the implementation of ERP software tools in SMEsis extremely vital for ensuring their growth and success in the market which will enable them to transform their business operations in the market. The ERP tools would play a vital role in providing the SMEs with a foundation for conducting their transaction-based business and at the same time help in to ensure cost savings and operational improvement. The ERP tools would help the SMEs to tackle the existing business competition in an effective manner and help them to develop a competitive advantage over their business rivals. A total of 578 SMEs were surveyed as a part of this report and among them almost 80% were antic ipating a growth in their overall profits and revenues. The report also states that in order to ensure the successful realisation of their business goals, it is extremely vital for the business establishments to contain their rising costs of their business operations. This will enable the business establishments to ensure that their revenue growth is not coming at the expense of their profits (Kearns Sabherwal, 2006). The report also found out that the Best-in-ClassERP implementationsare yielding the following benefits for the small and medium business establishments: Lowering operating costs by 22% Lowering the administrative costs by 20% 17% reductions in inventory (MD only) 19% improvement in the on-time delivery 17% improvement in the scheduled compliance (MD only) Preliminary Investigation and Evaluation In order to ensure the long term growth of an organisation, an effective planning on the part of the management is absolutely imperative and essential. The ERP tools precisely help the business establishments in this regard. IT helps the management to undertake effective business decisions by providing them an opportunity to evaluate the long term impacts of their business decisions. It helps the business decisions to indentify the different risks which an organisation has to face in the market and thus the business establishments are better prepared to tackle and address those risks. Moreover, the ERP software tools help them to monitor their business operations in the market. It helps the business establishments to understand their strengths and weakness in the market. Thus, the business establishments are able to identify their business shortcomings which are bringing down their productivity in the market and this helps the business establishments to address their business shortco mings and bottlenecks in an effective manner (Beatty Williams, 2006). ERP tools help the business establishments to evaluate the diverse aspects of their business by ensuring an effective financial control over their daily business activities in the market. when organizations are able to come up with robust planning and budgeting for their business, a business establishment is able to maximise the utilisation of the available resources at their disposal and this helps them to prevent the unnecessary wastage of their resources. This helps in bringing down the cost of business operations for an organisation and helps them to maximise the profits and revenues which they generate from the market. The business establishments are able to realise their long term business goals and objectives in the market and they are able to transform their business fortunes in the market. Thus, the business establishments are able to tackle the existing competition in the market in an effective manner for developing competitive advantage in the industry in which they are op erating (Malhotra Temponi, 2010). Concept Definition Enterprise resource planning(ERP) can be considered to be a category of business managementsoftwares which provide a wide variety of choices to the business establishments which helps in satisfying the different needs of an organisation. The ERP software essentially comprises of an integrated applications suite which can be utilised by a business establishment for the purpose of collecting, storing, managing and interpreting data from their different functional activities in the market which includes product planning, purchasing of raw materials, manufacturing or service delivery, marketing and sales, inventory management, delivery and payment of receipts (Chen et al. 2008). ERP tools play a vital role in providing the business establishments with a detailed view (in real-time) of their core business processes by utilising the data which is effectively stored andmaintained bydatabase management systems. ERP systems play a very essential role in tracking and monitoring the various resources utilised by a business establishment such as liquid cash,raw materials, productivity, etc. This helps in effectively monitoring the status of business commitments which have been undertaken by the small and medium business establishments which includes purchase orders andpayroll. The diverse set of business applications which comprise the ERP systems helps to ensure an effective sharing of information and data across various functional levels of an organisation (e.g. - production, purchase, accounting, sales, etc.) which are providing those data. Thus, the ERP system helps in facilitating an effective flow of information between the topmost business hierarchy and the lowermost levels of the organisation, thereby helping the organisation to satisfy the interests of their different stakeholders in the market (Ifinedo, 2008). The ERP software has been available in the market for the past two decades and this software application essentially evolved from an earlier form of software which was known as the MRP (Material Requirement Planning). The MRP has existed in the market for almost 20 years before the ERP came into existence. ERP software has been developed keeping in mind the minds the various business requirements of a typical organisation and thus it plays such an efficient role in managing all the diverse aspects of a business establishment. ERP also provides the opportunity to their users to customize them according to the needs and requirements of the diverse industries in which those systems are being utilised at present (Asemi Jazi, 2010). Experiment identification and Planning For ensuring the growth and success of an organisation, understanding the needs and preferences of the customers in really essential as it helps the business establishments to generate the necessary sales which are going to help them in sustaining their business operations in the market. This will essentially determine the amount of profits and revenues which the organisation is going to generate in the market. ERP systems can also be utilised to understand the present market trends which invariably helps the business establishments to indentify the customer buying behaviour in the market. It helps the business establishments to conduct an effective market analysis which enables the business establishments to identify the needs and preferences of their customers in the market (Hoeven, 2009). The ERP systems are playing a vital role in helping the business establishments to incorporate an effective advertising and marketing campaigns which helps in popularizing their products and serv ices among their customers. Thus, the business establishments are able to provide their customers with the appropriate products and services which help in satisfying the needs and expectations of the customers in the market. This helps the business establishments in ensuring customer satisfaction for their consumers and thus the business establishments are able to enforce brand loyalty among their customers band retain their customers for the long haul (Finney Corbett, 2007). Reference Davenport, T. H. (2013).Process innovation: reengineering work through information technology. Harvard Business Press. Fitzsimmons, J., Fitzsimmons, M. (2013).Service management: Operations, strategy, information technology. McGraw-Hill Higher Education. Kearns, G. S., Sabherwal, R. (2006). Strategic alignment between business and information technology: a knowledge-based view of behaviors, outcome, and consequences.Journal of management information systems,23(3), 129-162. Chen, R. S., Sun, C. M., Helms, M. M., Jih, W. J. K. (2008). Aligning information technology and business strategy with a dynamic capabilities perspective: A longitudinal study of a Taiwanese Semiconductor Company.International Journal of Information Management,28(5), 366-378. Velcu, O. (2010). Strategic alignment of ERP implementation stages: An empirical investigation.Information Management,47(3), 158-166. Hoeven, H. V. D. (2009). ERP and business processes: illustrated with Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009. Asemi, A., Jazi, M. D. (2010). A comparative study of critical success factors (CSFs) in implementation of ERP in developed and developing countries.International Journal,2(5), 99-110. Karim, J., Somers, T. M., Bhattacherjee, A. (2007). The impact of ERP implementation on business process outcomes: A factor-based study. Journal of Management Information Systems,24(1), 101-134. Ifinedo, P. (2008). Impacts of business vision, top management support, and external expertise on ERP success.Business Process Management Journal,14(4), 551-568. Srivardhana, T., Pawlowski, S. D. (2007). ERP systems as an enabler of sustained business process innovation: A knowledge-based view.The Journal of Strategic Information Systems,16(1), 51-69. Malhotra, R., Temponi, C. (2010). Critical decisions for ERP integration: Small business issues.International Journal of Information Management,30(1), 28-37. Finney, S., Corbett, M. (2007). ERP implementation: a compilation and analysis of critical success factors.Business Process Management Journal,13(3), 329-347. Beatty, R. C., Williams, C. D. (2006). ERP II: best practices for successfully implementing an ERP upgrade.Communications of the ACM,49(3), 105-109.

Thursday, November 28, 2019

History of Special Education Essay Example Essay Example

History of Special Education Essay Example Paper History of Special Education Essay Introduction Running head: History of Special Education History of Special Education Julie G. Delk Grand Canyon University: SPE 526 May 4, 2011 Abstract The realm of Special Education has many components and features. It has a well rounded historical background and the laws governing special education are equally as important to discuss. A key point to discuss is the Individuals with Disabilities Act-its laws and principles that are associated with Special Education. Challenges found within Special Education are also discussed with current times and themes and also prospecting into the future. The History of Special Education Introduction When our education system was established, a thought seemed to never cross the minds of educators that those possessing difficulties in learning were even capable of learning. This attitude handicapped the progress of education to such an extent that those with exceptionalities were often cast aside and often viewed as a burden to society. This thought progressi vely began to change towards the 17th and 18th centuries. Pioneers such as Pinel Philippe, Jean-Marc Gaspard Itard, Eduoard Seguin, and Samuel Gridley Howe are just a few of the many who felt that children with difficulties can learn and developed special education techniques that are still actively present in teaching strategies of today. Perhaps these individuals saw that through observation and demonstrating compassion that these attitudes revealed a glimpse of hope, a hope for a brighter future for children with disabilities. History of Special Education Essay Body Paragraphs More so that through the perseverance of advocates and parents of persons with disabilities a creation of change in behavior and attitudes of society were beginning. Special education has been a heavily discussed topic in the realm of government and in legislation. Litigation and Legislation for Special Education One of the biggest concerns of those afflicted with disabilities and the families of those disabled was discrimination and the unfair treatment of children with disabilities. At one point in time educators often felt that they should not educate those with disabilities because the assumption was these individuals were unable to learn. Some educators, however had the same concern and wanted to better the lives of those whom they taught. In Brown v. the Board of Education, Topeka, KS, a finding was made that teachers could discriminate against any student because of individual differences of those with disabilities. Two other court decisions also were helpful in the developmen t of special education. These two cases were held in Supreme Court: Pennsylvania Association for Retarded Children v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and Mills v. Board of Education, Washington, D. C. These two cases applied the right to a free and appropriate education for students with disabilities. The American court system has continually played an active role in special education and continues to enforce these rulings. Legally schools must provide the education in special education or prepare to face legal action or consequences. History of legislation in the regards to special education was precedential in the landmark decision-The Rehabilitation Act of 1973. In particular, Section 504 of this Act mandated that there would be no discrimination for those with disabilities. The law had a broad definition of the term disability and encompassed those who had disabilities not particularly covered in special education laws or court decisions. This law was the first step in the legislat ion of recognizing the civil rights of disabled persons. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004(referred to as IDEA) Special education became institutionalized in public and private school settings when Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 became law. According to the Wikipedia article (n. d. ) Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 â€Å"is a United States federal law that governs how states and public agencies provide early intervention, special education, and related services to children with disabilities. † The educational needs of children from birth to 18 or 21 are addressed in cases that involve several specified categories of disability. States that accept funding under IDEA are subject to its law and regulation. IDEA and its predecessor statutes arose from the idea that free and appropriate education for children with disabilities should no longer be withheld because of a person’s disability-which is in direct violation of the right to due process. This Act has been amended and reauthorized and was finally released in 2004, which contained several amendments. IDEA’s outline intended for outcomes for each child is prepared for furthering the education, job fulfillment, and self efficacy. Wikipedia further states(n. d. ) â€Å"Under IDEA 2004: Special education and related services should be designed to meet the unique learning needs of eligible children with disabilities, preschool through age 21. Students with disabilities should be prepared for further education, employment, and independent living. † Furthermore, IDEA protects the rights of those individuals, keeps schools in regulatory necessity for checks and balances, and students that have disabilities benefit to their fullest potential. Current and Future Challenges in the Field of Special Education Without a proper and fundamental understanding of the definition of children with exceptionalities, an educator may find a very di fficult task to educate and this failure may result in no success of learning on the behalf of the student. The term that describes abilities that differ from the norm either above or below to such an extent that they require an individualized program of special education and related services to fully from education(Heward, 2009). The term exceptional children includes children who experience difficulties in learning as well as those whose performance is so superior that modification in curriculum and instruction are necessary to help them fulfill potential†(p. 9). Labeling children with terms such as â€Å"children with disabilities† or â€Å"handicapped children† are no longer viewed as appropriate for use in describing exceptional children. Perhaps labeling is essential for demographic or educational purposes as well as for those seeking benefits to special educational services. Never the less exceptional children require pecialized education and services. The re are many factors to consider when labeling an individual. Advantages are many as the same is applied to disadvantages. The challenge currently is to find the appropriate measure of the label itself. Professionals in special education have legitimate reason to feel good about the overall progress in the field of special education. Educators continue to learn to work as partners with families and other educational agencies on behalf of exceptional children. There is still more work that needs to be done however. Research continues to be a key component to close the gap in the educational practice in special education. The continuous learning of the techniques of what works best in the classroom is an ever growing process. Educators have learned much about how to teach effectively children with severe disabilities, whom many previously had assumed were incapable of learning. Heward (2009) reports that â€Å"It is critically important for special education to close the gap between f ield’s knowledge of evidence-based practices and the curriculum and instruction that students receive† (p. 43). Several challenges educators in this field are facing currently as well what future obstacles are the availability of early intervention and prevention programs, helping students with disabilities adjust from school to adult life, and improve the special education-general education partnership. Other issues such as cultural and linguistic diversity are concerns as well. Schools sometimes may not always be effective as they should be providing the best or most desired experiences for culturally and linguistically diverse students. This failure often results in student failure as a whole. This result often times in a misinterpretation of a disability rather than the responsibility of the school to provide appropriate curriculum and instruction. The important point to remember is that everyone is different and educators must be aware of this fact. Educators must find the open line of communication as a common ground. This does pose some risk but the reward outweighs the risk taken in the discovery of different sets of values. No one should fear the differences between other there is a great opportunity to be discovered. Conclusion There is a continuing struggle for those with disabilities for acceptance and survival. Without special education, these individuals would still be seen and viewed as worthless and unsuitable products of society. The individuals who have persevered for the rights of the disabled have brought many wrong assumptions to light for correction. Special education has come a long ways and the laws that regulate it are there to protect these individuals. Through detailed and tailored instruction, these individuals can realize their fullest potential and contribute to the society as a whole. References Brown v. Board of Education. 347 U. S. 483 (1954). Heward, W. L. (2009). Exceptional children: An introduction to special e ducation(9th ed. ). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004, Pub. L. No. 108-446, 118  § 2647. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (n. d. ). Retrieved May 3, 2011 from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Individuals_with _Disabilities_Education_Act Mills v. Board of Education, 348 F. Supp. 866 (1972). The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Pub. L. No. 93-112, 87 Stat. 394, 29 U. S. C.  §701. We will write a custom essay sample on History of Special Education Essay Example specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on History of Special Education Essay Example specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on History of Special Education Essay Example specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer